mobile

All posts tagged mobile


If you have spent any time on the internet at all, you already know that it can be hard to get away from negative and toxic content, video game communities included. Hate speech, trolls, unwanted aggression, intolerance, and so on continue to poison many digital gathering spaces. One element to the creation of toxic digital spaces is the anonymous nature of the internet, but ThatGameCompany seems to have designed Sky with that cautiously in mind. Sky proves that anonymity itself doesn’t have to be fuel for negativity, but rather can exist in a system where everyone is uplifted. In this IOS exclusive the main way players progress through the game is by interacting with others in an anonymous format, and yet I was genuinely uplifted emotionally every time I logged on.

The gameplay goal of Sky is simple, the layout is somewhat similar to Journey The classic indie adventure from the same developers. Players progress simply by traveling the distance from the start to the end, while looking for Spirits and Ancestors to open each new area. Levels are made up of simple puzzles and large play areas that offer exploration and sightseeing as the main activities generally. Players spread their wings and fly through the open sky and narrow wind tunnels, through forests in the clouds, and into ancient temples and ruins. The players only resource/HP to really manage as far as world progression is the light that fuels your flight ability, which can easily be gained by standing near any fire, candle, friendly creature, and even other players. Players must locate ancestors in each level which somehow brings life back to the lost souls and allows for the next level to be explored. All Ancestors and Spirits found move the player closer to gaining new cosmetic items and allow the option to build relationships with other players and spirits themselves. This loop of gathering light to fly, flying to explore, and exploring to “rescue” the spirits and ancestors on each stage make up the body of the game. The game is certainly best experienced with companions, and many of the obstacles to success in Sky such as the flame draining rain or getting lost are also alleviated with a friend or two to help.

I wanted to enjoy Sky a lot when I discovered it but was concerned that the beautiful landscapes and scenic skies would clash with my player-to-player interactions. I was delighted immediately as I started my adventure, and quickly found I could not have been more wrong. Not only did the developers find a way to keep player interactions focused on the positive, but they built player reciprocity and giving into the actual progression mechanics of the game. It is clear that Sky is doing something great, and other games could take a note from it’s successful focus on positivity in it’s handling of multiplayer interactions.

Here are some of the mechanics that created such a positive a beautiful experience:

  • You name others, not yourself

When you encounter another player in the environment they are grey and without distinction, like a colorless ghost. Offering friendship to them is shown as you offering a candle to them, and rather than showing a name they picked for themselves, you will give them a name that is only for your reference. The grey melts off the shadow as light illuminates your new friend, and all their cosmetic items and chosen style are no longer hidden. This is when the player is prompted to name their new partner. No more immersion breaking names made of crass middle-school humor between the numbers 420 and 69, now the only names you see are the ones you give others. Sure if you wanted to you could fill your screen with silly and wildly inappropriate names, but if you did it wouldn’t bother any other player’s scenic pleasant experience. Names are only visible to those who named them. in a small way, this feature also has the secondary benefit of giving a small amount of creative control over their game of Sky. Someone who wants their world to be more mystical may name players based on fantasy names, or name friends based on the context of meeting (which is what I do). If I am playing and I meet someone in the rain who gives me fire when mine is out (a wonderful mechanic also just put in there to be nice and promote cooperation), I may name that person something like “Friend in Floods”, or “Shrouded Healer”. All friends are added to your progression menu (shown as constellations in the sky), and you can then freely boots all your friends light levels when you log on.

  • Giving and receiving is mutually beneficial, so everyone benefits from sharing the light

Though it does cost a lamp to friend another players (an item crafted by collecting lots of light), this is still essentially paying a small amount of candle light now to get more in the future, as boosting friends light is free and is the best way to get people to send you light back.

  • You can offer to help others by letting them tag along for a ride by holding hands

If you are having trouble finding some of the more well hidden spirits and candles you can always offer to take the hand of someone else and both characters will hold hands. One person is in control then and is free to fly or walk around the map without worrying about their new friend getting lost or falling behind. The ability to hold strangers hands and to fly around in an incredibly beautiful environment with someone else is magical. I’ve had a lot of good experiences just hanging out with new friends and bringing light to other players we come across. There seems to be no limit to the number of players who can hold hands and at one point I had joined a group that had 5 players all soaring and adventuring across the landscape together.

  • Actual player to player chat is always consensual, opt-in, and you must be friends first

Another feature that seems to help greatly in making sure that chat and social interaction is as positive an experience as it can be is that chat is only available to friends, and you actually have to sit on a bench in the game together, and both opt to have a conversation. This small barrier that requires consent and intentionally leaves little reason or room for harassment. It’s more about letting people talk one on one if they have spent time in game together and want to communicate, rather than a message board for anyone in the game to shout through. It’s more spontaneous and intimate, because the players have to find a bench first surrounded by natural beauty. Again, of course people can still inject negativity into another players experience, but if desired players can opt to just not see messages and just enjoy the music and scenery.

  • The setting of the game is clearly about wonder, beauty, collaboration, and sharing

With all the helpful steps that the developers took to ensure that players feel deep positive feeling while playing their game, the setting might be the strongest influence of player behavior. Though the various game mechanics make it harder for people to be a jerk while playing, it’s really the visuals, music, and story that make the player want to be respectful and kind to others. It is true that the specific themes in Sky may not always translate well to other more competitive games, but the concept still works. Things like being able to vote for teammate medals at the end of an Overwatch match are a great example of devs giving players opportunities to opt-into positive interactions in a competitive game. If the future of gaming is to reach bigger and more diverse audiences incorporating intentional mechanics and themes of positivity into future games is a vital element. Sky is a great example of how relaxation, collaboration, and entertainment can all exist within one game, bringing those who engage with it, closer to one another, and can even encourage compassion and other positive emotional skills that are vital to our national and personal prosperity.

If art is powerful, as I believe it is, interactive art has a particularly impactful influence on those who engage with it. I’m grateful to have a place as peaceful and simple as Sky to visit at the end of a day full of stress or anxiety.  Interactions with others are usually focused on exploring together or simply exchanging simple gifts, and demand little from players with social anxiety. And while the visuals and music are incredible and would make for a peaceful experience by themselves, the ability to experience the seamless immersion of Sky with other players is the most magical part of the journey. We are all in this life on Earth here together, let’s work to make physical and digital spaces both places that welcome all and encourage cooperation and creativity.

As always, Happy Gaming Friends

Indie Studio Mobrite returns with a followup game to their original zombie hit Dead Ahead. Fight rather than flee in this combat focused squeal. 

Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is the follow-up game to the mobile game simply titled Dead Ahead from developer and publisher Mobrite. It is available on IOS and Android and is free to play. Dead Ahead is a simple game where the player is tasked with escaping the zombie hordes that are chasing them in a side-scrolling, obstacle-filled driving game for mobile. Zombie Warfare features the same unique visual charm, with a huge array of new characters, enemies, weapons and locations to enjoy the apocalypse. As the name implies, Zombie Warfare’s gameplay is focused on combat, but with a heavy coating of micro-transactions it’s hard to focus on its interesting gameplay and graphics.

Setting and Graphics – An Expanded World for Dead Ahead

One of the main ingredients that made the first game a joyful experience to play was the game’s graphics and subtle world building. The first game’s opening cinematic creates a sense of dread but also shows a glimpse of the world the player will be inhabiting. Its characters are hand drawn and have a cute, almost chibi quality to them. The player drives a pizza delivery scooter, and most of the zombies have cute (even mildly sexy) designs, making Mobrite’s apocalypse a fun, playful and unique world to survive in. This followup game features even more of the same high-quality pixel art, and creative character and enemy designs. There are a large collection of survivors to unlock from civic employees and civilians like the shotgun-wielding farmer and the armored Fireman to fully armed military and police units. There are plenty of new zombies and even human enemies as well. Your squad will occasionally go up against roaming gangs, some of which are half infected with the zombie virus and brandish ranged weapons or special armor.

Overall the art style and environment in Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is high quality for what is there, but does seem to be lacking a bit of the charm that was present in the first title. This specifically is felt with the game having no cartoon cinematic into, and the campaign feels very much like a set of levels, not a continuing journey, and there is no story at all. This would be fine but it seems like the game is trying to have a larger scope than the first title, though it really is just in level variations and not in an overarching story. It’s hard to not be a bit disappointed by this, as it seems like a missed opportunity, especially as the world map gives the feeling of being in a whole world of zombies to explore. This is not a major mark against the game though, as the levels feature a high variety of enemies and visual palettes.

Gameplay and Mechanics-  The Game has Good Bones, with Flawed Execution

Pushing any non-gameplay issues aside, there are great things to say about the backbone of the game.  The concept of a PvZ style strategy game in the universe of Dead Ahead works well on paper. Seeing the small pixelated characters running off their battle bus into the zombie hoard is great. The basic game rules are that the player has 2 main resources to manage: “Courage” (blue meter) and “Rage” (Red meter). All units and abilities cost one of these resources and the player will have to choose a “hand” of 6 units/abilities out of their total unlocked (or bought). As the level timer ticks on the player slowly builds courage, while every kill builds rage, both of which are used to drop units and objects onto the battlefield. all units attack and move automatically, and the player must deal a certain amount of damage to the enemy barrier to win. Unlike PVZ though, units behave somewhat as if they are in lanes, but there is no way to control which of these invisible “lanes” they will move to attack or defend it. The player units have AI behavior that is designed to have them respond to threats ahead of them or when enemies are in close proximity, but sometimes the AI is not very responsive, which is a huge problem in a game where taking ANY DAMAGE to your battle bus at all will cause the player to lose their 3-star score. This has lead to many frustrating times of my units allowing a single weak zombie to run past, or to not fire at the most critical target because they moved to another lane automatically. This could be fixed with set lanes, or with the addition of manual focus fire or move orders, but neither of these are in the current build.

Price and Micro-Transactions – Mid to Late Gameplay is Very “Pay-to-Win”

The promising qualities of great art, a good gameplay premise, and the pedigree of an enjoyable first game make Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare all that more disappointing when the whole product is taken into consideration. In order to actually enjoy the positive game elements, the player will be loaded down with having to watch a lot of ads that remind them that the game is going to be unbalanced if they don’t start paying real money. I will say that when playing this game to review it for this article I did not pay any money but rather just relied on the daily login bonus and set out to grind for any currency I lacked. This made the experience start off as a fun game with a simple loop of fighting and upgrading my units. As with most games that feature an XP or currency-based upgrade system the amount of currency or XP required for a level up or upgrade is increasingly high for each new tier. This increase in upgrade prices is unreasonably steep and causes players who are not using micro-transactions to essentially be soft-locked out of the higher level units and even the final worlds of the game. At this point in the game’s progression, it is becoming obvious that the game is designed to have players pony up more than just a few bucks now and again to be able to continue playing.

Is having to pay for a mobile game really that absurd? Well no, it would not be if there was a way to pay one time to remove adds, but there is not. It wouldn’t be so bad if the paid products where at least priced well so that $3.99 (what I would pay for this title if the progression was balanced) got you enough gold to buy all the “base” units, but it is not. Not even close. For example, if someone pays $2.99 they get 500 coins. Several of the low power units cost around 700 coins, and the ones you’ll need halfway through the game’s progression are usually 3,000 – 15,000 coins. See? Not even close… Also to really put the nail in the coffin, the most interesting units are not only super expensive, but they can ONLY be bought with real cash, like the pic below of the super OP SWAT unit bundle, demanding $30.

All the extra bits – everyone loves bonus content!

The development team did seem to add some clever extra bits to the game that are worth mentioning. These extra features are not particularly robust or game-changing but are still worth mentioning. Elements like a simple auto battle PvP mode to get a few extra coins, a bonus game mode that cycles through several options a month, and a community discussion board in the game app that allows people to post fan art, and discuss strategy are all good ideas that add just a little extra content to the game. The bonus game modes and the PvP game show the differences between paying players and free players very obviously, and it is unlikely that non-paying players will be featured on any high score boards.

Conclusion

When considering that the game is soft-locked at higher difficulties unless players pay a unwarranted amount of cash, combined with the clumsy inaccurate nature of the enemies and units, along with essentially all resources being on timers rather than allowing for meaningful or satisfying progressing, Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is a game that has many compelling gameplay elements, but in the end is more frustrating to play than it is fun.

Final Score: 5/10

If you have an experience with this game you want to share, positive or negative feel free to share your thoughts in the comments. As always…

Happy gaming friends!

Florence is a game that possesses a level of elegance that is rare in a mobile game. This is of course not the first mobile game to have high artistic aspirations, but it is not often that a project is created with such a pure and simple execution.

Florence is a beautiful mobile game developed by Mountains Studios, and published by Annapurna Interactive.

Equal parts digital comic, and interactive game, Florence tells a story of love that is relatably human, and beautifully artistic. Paired with an incredible soundtrack (which is done by Kevin Penkin) Florence is a truly beautiful piece of art. Deep and moving melodies sweep over the player and transport them into a world where the music takes the place of words, and communicates the experiences and events to the player absent of dialogue. The story is presented to the player through digital comic like frames that feature numerous opportunities for players to interact with the story.For instance when Florence wakes up, and you are able to move a toothbrush around the screen to help her brush her teeth. In one frame she is commuting to work on a bus and the player is able to interact with her social media app on her phone. Little puzzles and interactions like this make the experience of playing Florence fun and whimsical. It should be noted that there is no “losing” in Florence as the story will come to the same conclusion no matter what the player chooses to do. There are a few short puzzles that the player will need to complete in order to move forward, but nothing prohibitively difficult.

My only complaint about Florence is it’s short length. At the end of the game I found myself desperately wanting more of the great experience that I had just walked through. I enjoyed the whole game in one sitting with my wife, which took about 30 minutes or so. Brevity in itself is perhaps not a mark against it, but rather an indication of it’s well executed presentation. It is a short game that wastes no time, and every image and song is a rare form of simple magic. Florence is not one noted as it might seem to be at first glance. Florence explores many aspects of love, self discovery, and the emotions around real decisions that people must make as they grow up. The tone of Florence could be compared somewhat films such as Begin Again, or La La Land, featuring both happy and melancholy moments backed by an exceptional and moving cello soundtrack. Florence is an exceptional example of what great storytelling can be in a digital experience. The specifics of the story are not particularly important as much as the settings and emotions surrounding them.

Because the experience is relatively short it’s hard to talk about the game without giving away too much of the story or showing all the game mechanics. The best thing I can say about it is go get the game, and enjoy it for yourself. I personally really hope that Mountains Studios decides to make more short stories in a similar style but with different settings. Whatever else we get from them in the future, short story or otherwise, I’m sure it will be great.

Florence is currently available on IOS for $3 and coming soon to Android. Next time you want to get lost in a great soundtrack and story, drop a couple bucks and get this great game! The soundtrack is available on Spotify, though I would wait until after you’ve played the game as the songs are listed as all the chapter titles and contain minor spoilers. I’ve been listening for a few days now and thoroughly been enjoying it (seriously, it’s so good!).

Have an awesome day, and Happy Gaming Friends!

Stormbound is a game I wrote a review for a while ago when it first came out. Stormbound’s development team even since then has been hard at work making the game better with new cards, performance updates, and new campaign missions. They even added the one thing I criticized them for in my review which was adding a private matchmaking mode! I’m personally still having a great time with it and now the developers want to know what card the community would have added to the game! The coolest thing about this probably is that new abilities and custom art are being taken into consideration for this competition. I personally was hoping for this competition to pool good ideas from the community and produce a new card pack or at least a handful of cards, but it seems that there will only be one new card when the contest is over. The cool thing about this though is that the community gets to submit then vote on ALL aspects of this new card, and therefore will be a product constructed from all the most voted for ideas. There are also various prizes to be won, which according to the contest web page (which you can find here) are as follows:

ALL PARTICIPANTS – When you vote, be sure to include your Player ID number! All participants will receive 1 copy of the new card when it is added to Stormbound. 

CARD ABILITY – Players who submit a Card Ability that makes it into the voting round will receive 100 Rubies! 

CARD NAME – Players who submit a Card Name that makes it into the voting round will receive 100 Rubies! 

The schedule for voting/submissions are here as well. As of now, the first vote has already been cast, but there are still tons of categories to get your submissions in.

DATE(S) VOTING/SUBMISSION ROUND WINNING RESULT(S)
FEB 16 – 19 Vote for Card Type Unit
FEB 20 – 26 Submit Ability Ideas
FEB 27 – MAR 1 Vote for Card Ability
MAR 2 – MAR 5 Vote for Movement Speed
MAR 6 – MAR 13 Vote for Art Sketches
MAR 14 – MAR 19 Vote for Mana Cost
MAR 20 – MAR 26 Vote for Art Coloring
MAR 27 – APR 2 Vote for Strength & Ability Values
APR 3 – APR 9 Submit Name Suggestions
APR 10 – 13 Vote for Card Name

Submit entries and vote on the Contest Web Page.

Good luck everyone, and Happy Gaming!

For those who seek visceral death in bizarre, creepy fantasy lands, look no farther! Badland 1 was a great journey through a machine infested forest, and if you liked that then Badland 2 is the experience you’re looking for!

In 2013 Frogmind released the incredibly fresh and sharp game Badland. The original was compelling, surprising, eerie, and exhilarating. With the Game of the Year Edition bringing the single player level count to 100, I thought I probably didn’t want more Badland. After a few levels of Badland 2, I quickly changed my mind.

It should be noted that Badland 2 has been out for well over a year, but I personally hadn’t spent much time with it until just recently, and I think that it is well worth a mention here as a great indie mobile game recommendation. The game is a little old but still stands up incredibly well and is just as amazing as some of the better mobile games of this year.

Setting: Bizarre lands, familiar and new. The setting of Badland 2 starts off pretty much the same as the original. The unmistakable whimsy of Badland is seen through all the eerie and beautiful levels. The small fragile creature you control flaps through a twisted quiet forest that has been infested with machines. The sharp contrast between nature and metal starts as a familiar, yet effective mood. As the levels continue however the biome of the levels changes, introducing more realized versions of past level variations. Snow levels have new environmental challenges, like ice beams. Fire levels have lava flows, heat lamps, and lasers…so many lasers. And finally the hero (and their many clones) find themselves in an all new sort of void environment, with floating green plasma, new gravity mechanics, and puzzles.

No matter the color and style of the environments and puzzles, Bandland 2 is still very much the same game as the original at heart,  which is perfect. Any large departure from the original game mechanics would likely be a loss. The squeal feels much more like a natural progression from where the first game left off.

Gameplay: New Layers of Paint on the Same, Wonderful Game. For those who have not played the first installation, essentially the objective of any level is to get at least one of the flying (or rolling) creatures that you control to the end alive. Though there are other objectives, which i’ll talk about in a minute, this all the player needs to do to win any given level. There are of course always a gauntlet of spines, explosives, lasers, waterfalls, pits, and lava (to name a few) which the player must carefully avoid on their way to the goal. The controls are super easy to use, just tap the left or right side of the screen to move in that direction and keep from falling for a second. This creates a simple but challenging task as flying through levels usually demands a lot of avoiding things.

Some of my favorite times with Badland 2 (and 1 for that matter), are levels that incorporate a lot of the pick-ups that change speed and slow time. These are often combined with cloning pick-ups will split and duplicate the little creatures. There are some incredible moments in Badland 2 particularly that give the player a brief feeling of being out of control. Having  50 clones tear across an open map full of saws at super speed, then dramatically slowing time just before they all die is an example of the kinds of things that this game will impose upon it’s players. One new addition to the squeal is the occasional ability to stop time, which makes for some amazing moments. There are also pick-ups that will make the clones sticky, bouncy, fat and heavy, or tiny and fast. This makes for tons of crazy combinations that are tricky but always fun to experiment with.

Difficulty: Change your goals to change difficulty. Though the main goal of any given level is always to get at least one clone to the end, levels always have secondary objectives like getting a certain number of clones to the end, losing no clones, or finishing the level in one try. This challenge based objective system allows players to progress through most levels simply attempting them multiple times, while also allowing experienced players to challenge themselves by aiming for more specific (and much harder) goals. This allows Badland to be what the player wants; An atmospheric immersive experience, or a tight difficult set of challenges.

Badland 2 is not really new anymore, but it still holds up as one of my personal favorite mobile games. If you decide to get into the greatness that is the Badland games, bigger screens if available are recommended along with headphones. The game’s soundtrack is subtle but all the sound design blends together to make for a great audio experience. Badland 2 is available on Android and IOS. I believe that the only difference is that the IOS version is $4, while the Android version is free but plays ads unless you pay to remove them. Badland 1 Game of the Year edition is available on Steam for $10, with controls and levels adapted for PC. This Steam version also features a 4 player mode to play with friends!

The Badland games are some of my favorites for playing in my spare time and I defiantly recommend them to anyone at all interested!

As always, happy gaming friends! 

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Ever since pinball games began to fill arcades they’ve become a staple of the genre. Since the trend towards digital over physical arcade games has accelerated recently, tons of pinball style games have come out for PC, mobile, and even been featured in console games. From the classic 3D Pinball (space cadet) for Windows 95, to the Pinball-like mini game in Final Fantasy XV (Justice Monsters 5), Pinball games are everywhere. A quick visit to any App store will reveal dozens of Pinball games to choose from, but Pinout is the only one that has ever stayed on my iPhone/iPad for more than a few days. Here’s what makes this Pinball adaptation stand head and shoulders above its competition.

Simple, Elegant Design 

The style of Pinout, Mediocre’s newest title, is a clean, crisp series of ramps and tracks dipped in a thick coat of 80’s neon. The level design is reminiscent of arcade-style pinball cabinets but is stripped down to only the essentials. Familiar elements such as ramps, bonus points, mini-games, and high score are all present, but without the usual busyness of 1000 flashing lights, and sounds. The combination of simple design with a heavy dose of style is perfect. It’s just so damn, cool. This simple design not only adds to its aesthetic value but also makes it feel really natural to play on a phone sized screen.

Adapted for Mobile

Though the visual design of Pinout is stunning, the most interesting and innovative change made to original pinball games is its progressive level design. Instead of well-aimed shots gaining the player points on a static arcade table, a successful shot scrolls the board up to new paddles and tracks to use. This is a natural adaptation for mobile and feels awesome! It keeps the feeling of traditional pinball machines with an added feeling of motion and progression. The player is battling the clock to get to the end of each area with the most extra time left as possible. Players who end each level with a low time left will have the opportunity to replay that level in order to bring more bonus time into the next level. Finishing one of the harder levels with only 10 seconds to spare will inevitably mean doom, as finding enough bonus time-points to sustain a whole level starting with non is almost impossible. The need to bank time as a sort of currency gives the game a feeling of linear progression, in what could otherwise be a series of scattered and unconnected levels.

Amazing Soundtrack

From the moment I saw the trailer I knew I would love the style and feeling of Pinout, but I wasn’t expecting the soundtrack to be such a strong addition to the overall value of the game. for an arcade game Pinout has an unusually striking soundtrack. Each level has it’s own song dedicated to it. As the player battles their way through the maze of ramps they are simultaneous journeying through the album. The game trailer doesn’t feature any vocals, but several stages layer mesmerizing vocals over the hypnotic, electronic beats, deepening Pinout’s winning style. The soundtrack is by Douglas Holmquist, who is joined by by Susanna Lundgren for the vocal tracks. Douglas Holmquist has done OSTs for other games such as, Smash Hit, Beyondium, and Does Not Commute. Pinout’s OST is available on SpotifyBandCampGoogle Play, and iTunes.

Pinout itself is technically free, but won’t save your progress unless you pay for it, so essentially the free version is just a demo. To really enjoy Pinout as it is meant to be played you will need to buy the premium version, which is $3. Not a bad price at all for the quality of the game.

What I’d like to see changed

Pinout is a win in my book, two thumbs up, a “Must Buy” for arcade lovers. My only reservation about Pinout is that it is a little too short. I felt like the game was building to a more dramatic and energy infused game ending, but as I thought I would be approaching what might be new game elements or some kind of dramatic end-game sequence, the levels were all gone, and a new endless mode was unlocked. The Endless mode is actually pretty cool, and introduces more randomness into the gaming experience than the main game did, but I wanted more handcrafted levels, with new themes and  new game elements. Pinout did some really cool stuff with doors and buttons near the end, but didn’t explore these options as long as I wish they did. If the developers would release more levels with a new song for each level that would really make Pinout a home-run. I would even pay another dollar or so for another 5 stages. It feels like they have something really unique and amazing here, and I would love to see that expanded on and explored more. However, the short time I had with it I enjoyed immensely, and I still recommend it as a game purchase.

Pinout is available on IOS and Android, and is a great mobile game to kill time when waiting in lines but is equally fun to play on the couch with a beer on Saturday night.  With good mobile games being hard to come by, Pinout is a creative and well made gaming experience, with a level of design and style I hope to see in more titles in the future. Let the chillwave, 80’s trance vibes flow over you as you gaze into a maze of neon! What’s your best end game score?

If you have thoughts about Pinout, feel free to leave them in the comments section, and as always…

Happy Gaming Friends!