arcade

All posts tagged arcade

Indie Studio Mobrite returns with a followup game to their original zombie hit Dead Ahead. Fight rather than flee in this combat focused squeal. 

Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is the follow-up game to the mobile game simply titled Dead Ahead from developer and publisher Mobrite. It is available on IOS and Android and is free to play. Dead Ahead is a simple game where the player is tasked with escaping the zombie hordes that are chasing them in a side-scrolling, obstacle-filled driving game for mobile. Zombie Warfare features the same unique visual charm, with a huge array of new characters, enemies, weapons and locations to enjoy the apocalypse. As the name implies, Zombie Warfare’s gameplay is focused on combat, but with a heavy coating of micro-transactions it’s hard to focus on its interesting gameplay and graphics.

Setting and Graphics – An Expanded World for Dead Ahead

One of the main ingredients that made the first game a joyful experience to play was the game’s graphics and subtle world building. The first game’s opening cinematic creates a sense of dread but also shows a glimpse of the world the player will be inhabiting. Its characters are hand drawn and have a cute, almost chibi quality to them. The player drives a pizza delivery scooter, and most of the zombies have cute (even mildly sexy) designs, making Mobrite’s apocalypse a fun, playful and unique world to survive in. This followup game features even more of the same high-quality pixel art, and creative character and enemy designs. There are a large collection of survivors to unlock from civic employees and civilians like the shotgun-wielding farmer and the armored Fireman to fully armed military and police units. There are plenty of new zombies and even human enemies as well. Your squad will occasionally go up against roaming gangs, some of which are half infected with the zombie virus and brandish ranged weapons or special armor.

Overall the art style and environment in Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is high quality for what is there, but does seem to be lacking a bit of the charm that was present in the first title. This specifically is felt with the game having no cartoon cinematic into, and the campaign feels very much like a set of levels, not a continuing journey, and there is no story at all. This would be fine but it seems like the game is trying to have a larger scope than the first title, though it really is just in level variations and not in an overarching story. It’s hard to not be a bit disappointed by this, as it seems like a missed opportunity, especially as the world map gives the feeling of being in a whole world of zombies to explore. This is not a major mark against the game though, as the levels feature a high variety of enemies and visual palettes.

Gameplay and Mechanics-  The Game has Good Bones, with Flawed Execution

Pushing any non-gameplay issues aside, there are great things to say about the backbone of the game.  The concept of a PvZ style strategy game in the universe of Dead Ahead works well on paper. Seeing the small pixelated characters running off their battle bus into the zombie hoard is great. The basic game rules are that the player has 2 main resources to manage: “Courage” (blue meter) and “Rage” (Red meter). All units and abilities cost one of these resources and the player will have to choose a “hand” of 6 units/abilities out of their total unlocked (or bought). As the level timer ticks on the player slowly builds courage, while every kill builds rage, both of which are used to drop units and objects onto the battlefield. all units attack and move automatically, and the player must deal a certain amount of damage to the enemy barrier to win. Unlike PVZ though, units kinda behave as if they are in lanes, but there is no way to control which of these invisible “lanes” they will move to attack or defend it. The player units have AI behavior that is designed to have them respond to threats ahead of them or when enemies are in close proximity, but sometimes the AI is not very responsive, which is a huge problem in a game where taking ANY DAMAGE to your battle bus at all will cause the player to lose their 3-star score. This has lead to many frustrating times of my units allowing a single weak zombie to run past, or to not fire at the most critical target because they moved to another lane automatically. This could be fixed with set lanes, or with the addition of manual focus fire or move orders, but neither of these are in the current build.

Price and Micro-Transactions – Mid to Late Gameplay is Very “Pay-to-Win”

The promising qualities of great art, a good gameplay premise, and the pedigree of an enjoyable first game make Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare all that more disappointing when the whole product is taken into consideration. In order to actually enjoy the positive game elements, the player will be loaded down with having to watch a lot of adds that remind them that the game is going to be unbalanced if they don’t start paying real money. I will say that when playing this game to review it for this article I did not pay any money but rather just relied on the daily login bonus and set out to grind for any currency I lacked. This made the experience start off as a fun game with a simple loop of fighting and upgrading my units. As with most games that feature an XP or currency-based upgrade system the amount of currency or XP required for a level up or upgrade is increasingly high for each new tier. This increase in upgrade prices is unreasonably steep and causes players who are not using micro-transactions to essentially be soft-locked out of the higher level units and even the final worlds of the game. At this point in the game’s progression, it is becoming obvious that the game is designed to have players pony up more than just a few bucks now and again to be able to continue playing.

Is having to pay for a mobile game really that absurd? Well no, it would not be if there was a way to pay one time to remove adds, but there is not. It wouldn’t be so bad if the paid products where at least priced well so that $3.99 (what I would pay for this title if the progression was balanced) got you enough gold to buy all the “base” units, but it is not. Not even close. For example, if someone pays $2.99 they get 500 coins. Several of the low power units cost around 700 coins, and the ones you’ll need halfway through the game’s progression are usually 3,000 – 15,000 coins. See? Not even close… Also to really put the nail in the coffin, the most interesting units are not only super expensive, but they can ONLY be bought with real cash, like the pic below of the super OP SWAT unit bundle, demanding $30.

All the extra bits – everyone loves bonus content!

The development team did seem to add some clever extra bits to the game that are worth mentioning. These extra features are not particularly robust or game-changing but are still worth mentioning. Elements like a simple auto battle PvP mode to get a few extra coins, a bonus game mode that cycles through several options a month, and a community discussion board in the game app that allows people to post fan art, and discuss strategy are all good ideas that add just a little extra content to the game. The bonus game modes and the PvP game show the differences between paying players and free players very obviously, and it is unlikely that non-paying players will be featured on any high score boards.

Conclusion

When considering that the game is soft-locked at higher difficulties unless players pay a unwarranted amount of cash, combined with the clumsy inaccurate nature of the enemies and units, along with essentially all resources being on timers rather than allowing for meaningful or satisfying progressing, Dead Ahead: Zombie Warfare is a game that has many compelling gameplay elements, but in the end is more frustrating to play than it is fun.

If you have an experience with this game you want to share, positive or negative feel free to share your thoughts in the comments. As always…

Happy gaming friends!

It’s been over a month since Christmas and New Years Eve, and all of January I’ve been thinking about how games can bring people together. If your family and friends are anything like mine then you often spend time playing games together. Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving, reunions, vacations, etc… Card games, board games, video games, we love them all. It’s true that people tend to think of “party games” as being restricted mainly just to card and board games like Apples to Apples, Exploding Kittens, Cards Against Humanity, and so on. And though those are all great games to play with friends, there are so many video games which are great for entertaining groups of friends and family as well. This last Thanksgiving I even got my grandpa to play Mario Kart 8 on my Switch, which was an amazing and fun experience. He wasn’t that bad actually.

I wish that more people knew about the great wealth of multiplayer indie games that have been developed recently. Not only do playing games with friends make for a fun night because of the social aspect of gathering, but there is something powerful about experiencing interactive media with others that is absent in solely visual entertainment like cinema. Even today in 2018 video games often get the stigma “time wasters” or they are at least seen as  less valuable than film or other forms of art. However much research has gone into studying how games really affect us, and it’s pretty crazy the good things that games can for us. In fact, a friend of mine named Helen Nichols has a great article about “27 Science-Backed Benefits of Video Games” on her site Well Being Secrets, which I totally recommend you check out. I have gathered a list of particularly frantic and chaotic games that are guaranteed to bring your gaming party some big laughs. For your next party instead of breaking out one of your old board games people have played a hundred times, give one of these games a try for something a bit more unique.

There are a lot of classic party hits like Mario Kart, Smash Bros, or whatever COD game is lying around at the time. This list, however, is comprised of games that are a little less well known and have a certain element of frantic cooperation/competition that makes them both amazing couch multiplayer games, and a kick to watch for those who prefer to sip a cocktail and laugh at their friends. In no particular order, here are some of my favorites:

Overcooked

Overcooked is a hilarious, audacious, and generally ridiculous take on a simple teamwork cooking game. Players will be forced to scramble as their food orders pile up, causing them to communicate and strategize to discover the most efficient way to tackle the culinary tasks given to them. Supporting up to 4 players and devoid of any combat mechanics, Overcooked makes for an amazing multiplayer couch game when people want to play something a bit on the silly side. The cooking is pretty normal, it’s the worlds that get weird. Players will be asked to cook in moving cars, pirate ships, on ice floats, volcanoes, during earthquakes, and even in space! Different maps bring different mechanics that the players will have to deal with, for extra zainy fun. Overcooked is probably the most accessible and crowd friendly game on this list. It’s also available on a lot of platforms, being playable on PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, and through Steam.

Crawl

Crawl is somewhat comparable to Smash Bros, not so much in the match time, structure, or mood, but rather that one player always comes out on top, there are temporary alliances, crazy frantic arcade action, and everyone starts off equal every time. Though playable with 2 or 3 players, Crawl is at it’s best (and deadliest) with all 4 players battling for 1st. Arcade paced action with full controller support makes Crawl an amazing couch multiplayer game! Teams are constantly changing, and even when you “lose” by dying, you then re-join the other specters to torment the new survivor! This revolving door of alliances makes the already chaotic battle game that much more frantic and fun. Players struggle and race for the good shop items in an attempt to gain an edge against the overwhelming odds stacked against them, making the game fun for spectators to cheer for their hero of choice.

The pixel art in Crawl is simply amazing, and the whole game is a joy to behold (well, it’s also incredibly dark and ominous in presentation, but in that chilling, charming kind of way). Will the top player make it to that last dungeon room to fight the boss and win, or will they fall, leaving room for another t0 rise to the challenge? Crawl is relatively easy for new players to jump into. The game difficulty comes not in learning the controls, but simply with practice, as basically all creatures/weapons have no more than 2 attacks. Players who have played other combat driven games will obviously do better than those who don’t. Even so, it’s not too hard to learn the basics. With a relatively easy entry,  4 player controller support, and fast chaotic action, Crawl is perfect for groups big groups.

Crypt of the NecroDancer

Crypt of the Necrodancer is one of my favorite discoveries of 2015, and even though the game is a few years old now it still remains to be one of the most unique and fun multiplayer game experiences I’ve enjoyed. Though the game is only playable with 2 players at a time, it still makes for a great party game as the rounds can be fast (especially when death comes fast for inexperienced players). The overall vibe of the game is so wacky and fun it makes for a fun spectator game. NecroDancer is effectively half rhythm game, half dungeon crawler, empowering players to dance and fight to the groovy beats. This one is a bit harder for newbies to get used to, but can be very compelling to pass a few controllers around on death, due to the short round/level time. The frustrations that can accompany a unique and new game such as NecroDancer are somewhat relieved by the fact that the game is cooperative. What better way to dance battle against hoards of groovy undead than with a friend to struggle through it with. At any rate, whether you are a master at this odd DDR/D&D mix or a rookie scared to try to moonwalk, Crypt of the NecroDancer is a hilarious, creative, and fun game to share with friends. The sounds track is killer and should be enjoyed with that volume knob cranked up. It should also be mentioned that it’s a roguelike and the levels are procedurally generated, so even for veterans, the journey is new every time.

Invisigun Heroes

Invisigun Heroes is one of those games that didn’t seem to make as big of a media impact as it deserves. Though one could argue that operating under the radar is what Invisigun Heroes does best, as all the characters in the game are invisible. Even with the extended clip of gameplay, it’s a little hard to make out what exactly is even happening on screen. To really get the hang of Invisigun Heroes you really do have to just try it. This is certainly the game with the hardest level of entry on this list, but that is kinda one of the things that makes it so good. Essentially the game is a simple shooter with the one exception that everyone is cloaked until they fire, which briefly reveals their location. Players are all essentially just guessing where they are will inevitably bump into things causing trees to shake, leaving footprints in sand and snow, splashing water, and even sometimes run into each other. It’s kinda like playing tag in the dark in a small room, but in a good way!

The pixel art and level design is great, and the creative list of playable characters put unique and interesting abilities in the player’s hands. Invisigun Heroes works just as well with 2 players as it does with 4, and the map list is actually quite impressive, allowing for tons of variety in what is otherwise a fairly simple and straightforward game. As in Overcooked, the different worlds bring crazy obstacles all players will have to be wary of. In Invisigun Heroes though players can use these environmental elements to help them find, trap, trick, and kill other players. Ice levels have yeti’s that will pop out of caves, Egyptian themed levels have switches that toggle obstacles, and some factory stages even have cameras that will reveal players locations making them easy targets. A well-placed shot or trap is hard to master, but so satisfying when you do.  Though tricky to get used to, this game is perfect for parties as a match can be over in as little as 30 seconds. Line up 10 matches in a row, or surrender your controller after each kill to keep the action moving. Invisigun Heroes is available on Steam and itch.io.

The Bug Butcher

The Bug Butcher is another game that is only playable with up to 2 players, but it makes for a great heart pounding, high score chasing experience. Quick gameplay and level based challenges make for an easygoing controller passing experience. It’s probably better suited for playing with just one other person and working through the levels in order, but because the levels are so short (under 5 min to beat usually), and the game is so good I thought it deserved a mention here. This game is actually available on mobile devices which is where I played the majority of the campaign, but as far as I know, the multiplayer experience is only available on PC. The hand-drawn style graphics and visual design are awesome. I sincerely hope there is a Bug Butcher 2 at some point in the future.  The Bug Butcher is a simple but incredibly fun game, which you can read my full review of here.

Genital Jousting

And finally, we end our list with the crowning gaming creation that is…yes, Genital Jousting. This game is exactly what it sounds like, a game about dicks. It is hilariously irreverent and not at all ashamed of what it is. This game will at least be a hilarious conversation starter if nothing else. I do know this game can be a little bit divisive however as you really kinda have to know your audience with this one. Many people are likely to be offended, awkward, or even just grossed out by Genital Jousting (which is fair, cause it does get pretty gross). But that’s also part of the fun of it; It’s a crazy game where silly dick things play a ton of silly dick games that are somehow simultaneously sexual and routine. Maybe you want your willy to walk his/her dog (and yes, it’s a wiener dog). Perhaps you and your phallic friends will be racing, or playing soccer, or picking flowers, or a number of other preposterous competitions that real world wieners should never do. This game is awesome for parties because it’s not very technically demanding, and it’s playable with up to an insane max of 8 players! This weird and creative game is admittedly, very gross, but also in the same measure, strangely endearing.

That’s my list of 6 frantic multiplayer indie games for your next party. I hope they bring joy (and a little chaos) to your next Friday night gathering. If you have other great couch multiplayer games you like, let us know in the comments! And as always…

Happy Gaming Friends!

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Ever since pinball games began to fill arcades they’ve become a staple of the genre. Since the trend towards digital over physical arcade games has accelerated recently, tons of pinball style games have come out for PC, mobile, and even been featured in console games. From the classic 3D Pinball (space cadet) for Windows 95, to the Pinball-like mini game in Final Fantasy XV (Justice Monsters 5), Pinball games are everywhere. A quick visit to any App store will reveal dozens of Pinball games to choose from, but Pinout is the only one that has ever stayed on my iPhone/iPad for more than a few days. Here’s what makes this Pinball adaptation stand head and shoulders above its competition.

Simple, Elegant Design 

The style of Pinout, Mediocre’s newest title, is a clean, crisp series of ramps and tracks dipped in a thick coat of 80’s neon. The level design is reminiscent of arcade-style pinball cabinets but is stripped down to only the essentials. Familiar elements such as ramps, bonus points, mini-games, and high score are all present, but without the usual busyness of 1000 flashing lights, and sounds. The combination of simple design with a heavy dose of style is perfect. It’s just so damn, cool. This simple design not only adds to its aesthetic value but also makes it feel really natural to play on a phone sized screen.

Adapted for Mobile

Though the visual design of Pinout is stunning, the most interesting and innovative change made to original pinball games is its progressive level design. Instead of well-aimed shots gaining the player points on a static arcade table, a successful shot scrolls the board up to new paddles and tracks to use. This is a natural adaptation for mobile and feels awesome! It keeps the feeling of traditional pinball machines with an added feeling of motion and progression. The player is battling the clock to get to the end of each area with the most extra time left as possible. Players who end each level with a low time left will have the opportunity to replay that level in order to bring more bonus time into the next level. Finishing one of the harder levels with only 10 seconds to spare will inevitably mean doom, as finding enough bonus time-points to sustain a whole level starting with non is almost impossible. The need to bank time as a sort of currency gives the game a feeling of linear progression, in what could otherwise be a series of scattered and unconnected levels.

Amazing Soundtrack

From the moment I saw the trailer I knew I would love the style and feeling of Pinout, but I wasn’t expecting the soundtrack to be such a strong addition to the overall value of the game. for an arcade game Pinout has an unusually striking soundtrack. Each level has it’s own song dedicated to it. As the player battles their way through the maze of ramps they are simultaneous journeying through the album. The game trailer doesn’t feature any vocals, but several stages layer mesmerizing vocals over the hypnotic, electronic beats, deepening Pinout’s winning style. The soundtrack is by Douglas Holmquist, who is joined by by Susanna Lundgren for the vocal tracks. Douglas Holmquist has done OSTs for other games such as, Smash Hit, Beyondium, and Does Not Commute. Pinout’s OST is available on SpotifyBandCampGoogle Play, and iTunes.

Pinout itself is technically free, but won’t save your progress unless you pay for it, so essentially the free version is just a demo. To really enjoy Pinout as it is meant to be played you will need to buy the premium version, which is $3. Not a bad price at all for the quality of the game.

What I’d like to see changed

Pinout is a win in my book, two thumbs up, a “Must Buy” for arcade lovers. My only reservation about Pinout is that it is a little too short. I felt like the game was building to a more dramatic and energy infused game ending, but as I thought I would be approaching what might be new game elements or some kind of dramatic end-game sequence, the levels were all gone, and a new endless mode was unlocked. The Endless mode is actually pretty cool, and introduces more randomness into the gaming experience than the main game did, but I wanted more handcrafted levels, with new themes and  new game elements. Pinout did some really cool stuff with doors and buttons near the end, but didn’t explore these options as long as I wish they did. If the developers would release more levels with a new song for each level that would really make Pinout a home-run. I would even pay another dollar or so for another 5 stages. It feels like they have something really unique and amazing here, and I would love to see that expanded on and explored more. However, the short time I had with it I enjoyed immensely, and I still recommend it as a game purchase.

Pinout is available on IOS and Android, and is a great mobile game to kill time when waiting in lines but is equally fun to play on the couch with a beer on Saturday night.  With good mobile games being hard to come by, Pinout is a creative and well made gaming experience, with a level of design and style I hope to see in more titles in the future. Let the chillwave, 80’s trance vibes flow over you as you gaze into a maze of neon! What’s your best end game score?

If you have thoughts about Pinout, feel free to leave them in the comments section, and as always…

Happy Gaming Friends!

Looking for a great, original space action shooter available on PC, Consoles, and IOS? Well then my plasma pistol wielding, astro-exterminator friend, it’s time to rise to the occasion, and become… The Bug Butcher!

Your chunky space transport slowly touches down on a wintry planet, you know this will be just another day at the office. Maybe a science research project had gone horribly wrong, maybe someone touched a glowing meteor, or maybe it’s was just a really bad alien moth problem… but no matter what, the cold metal of the plasma pistol in your hand will soon be glowing hot with the hazy blue inferno of battle! Someone has called you; Someone has called The Bug Butcher, and that means that you were their final hope, their only chance… you won’t let them down!

The Bug Butcher is a whacky vertical shooter by Awfully Nice Studios and published by Noodle Cake Studios

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Setting: Humorous space cartoon action! 

The setting is not essential to the gameplay or story, as the game is an arcade shooter at heart. Nevertheless, the backgrounds and visual elements are compelling and creative additions to the world of The Bug Butcher. The player progresses through various levels of a remote outpost, seeking to exterminate the alien vermin that are attacking. All the enemies, weapons, and levels possess a certain cartoon/sci-fi element, reminiscent of a “spaceman spiff” sort of vibe. Each new area of the outpost has different environmental elements and new enemy types that require specific strategies and attack patterns to conquer!


As could be expected from an arcade shooter, there is no real storyline progression but the story isn’t really crucial to the game, since it really is just a reason to shoot alien bugs with energy weapons. Then again, who really needs much of a reason to shoot aliens? Cause you know… some aliens are just dicks. The game has a satisfying amount of new environments and levels without being distracting or reducing the focus on gameplay. The game is half a zany cartoon and half shoot-em-up. This combination is a perfect balance of both and makes for a simple, compelling, and at times humorous adventure. It’s well worth checking out.

Gameplay: Classic 2-button vertical shooter + gravity.

The Bug Butcher has humorous dialogue scenes and awesome cartoon graphics, but at its core, it’s a high score chasing, combo building, bullet blazing arcade game! The game mechanics are simple; the hero can walk or sprint back and forth, but can only shoot up, while enemies have a tendency to bounce, fly, or fall down, attacking from above. Some enemies split, some follow paths, and some can’t be slowed by bullets, causing various combinations and patterns to form, which are unique to each level. This creates a sense of fluidity and keeps the player learning and forces them to get better.


The game does feature an in-game currency which is used to buy new weapons, upgrades, and perks. Progressing through new enemy types unlocks new weapons which help with the increasing difficulty of the levels. Rockets, lasers, Gatling guns, and even a “lightning gun” are all at your disposal when facing the galactic hoards. Also for your use are speed boots, invincibility, ice bombs, and homing missile packs to level the playing field when backed up against a wall (or the floor!).

Difficulty: challenging but attainable. 

If you’re into climbing the high score chart and achieving 100% on every level this is a good game for you. Building combos without getting damaged will build your score multiplier, which you will have to rack up pretty high to achieve 3 stars on each stage. Every level is a multi-faceted challenge. If the alien insects don’t kill you, every level has a timer that exterminates everything in the chamber when it hits zero (including you!). The player must balance speed, attack, and defense to master all 5 floors of the complex.


One complaint personally is that the game is not terribly long. It is highly repayable, especially for those who did not get 3 stars on the first go at each level. There are 5 floors, with 6 levels each, the last of which is always a boss fight. with only 30 levels, each of which have  timer that is less often less than 5 min, presumably a skilled player could finish the game in around 2 and a half hours. This is my only complaint.

If the game is too easy or too hard, you can switch to any of 3 levels of difficulty at any time. Conquered all levels at 100% on normal? Seek those golden medals of mastery on hard mode for a real challenge! Don’t like fighting alone? If you’re playing on PC you can battle against friends too! Unfortunately the current IOS version of the game does not have a multiplayer mode, but hopefully they will add this in an update.


The Bug Butcher is available on Steam for $8, and  IOS/Android, for $4. The game is not super long but, still well worth the price. If you love arcade shooters, I recommend you check this one out. I’ve really enjoyed my time playing it and will keep it around on my phone for when I need to kill some time (and consequently, some galactic vermin!)

Happy Gaming Space Friends!

Enter the Gungeon: Our Full Review

With the massive surge of rouge-like games flooding Steam, it might be hard to find the best ones. But fear no more! It has officially been confirmed, Enter the Gungeon is what you’ve been waiting for!

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Enter the Gungeon is an arcade style, rouge-like, dungeon crawling game available for PC and PS4. It’s developed by Dodge Roll Games and is published by Devolver Digital. Like  practically everything that Devolver publishes, this game is AWESOME!  I’ve been playing EtG almost constantly since I bought It this summer, and after 60+ hours of dungeon-crawling, dodge-rolling action I still have a fat stack of items and guns to unlock! The game is hugely fun solo and even better co-op. One of the great appeals of this title is the sheer number of unlockables available to the player. With 180+ guns and 150+ items to discover and wield, each delve continues to be interesting and new.

As per my usual review style, I find it helpful to break my experience down into three categories; setting, gameplay, and difficulty. Though there are certain elements that are consistent in all good games, some games are awesome due to their adept use of dialogue and storytelling (such as Kentucky Route Zero and Bastion), while others excel at having intrinsically fun gameplay mechanics. Enter the Gungeon has a bit of everything + more gun puns than you thought existed!

Setting: dungeon crawling as you have never seen before!

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The setting of EtG is especially interesting because it is both familiar and new. The game takes the familiar idea of  the procedurally generated dungeon and adds guns to EVERYTHING! Almost all the loot that your character will find in each delve adds guns, ammo types,  mags, bombs, etc… to your arsenal. The combination has perfect synergy. With a gun-themed dungeon, there are hilarious gun puns at ever turn. Even the enemies you fight are mostly bullets and guns that have been re-animated by the mysterious powers of the Gungeon! You can use “bullet time” and “Shotgun Coffee” to get the upper hand in tense situations. Or try using “Gundromona Strain” with the “Ring of Triggers” for a heavy damage tactical advantage! The Gungeoneer’s weapon choices are equally punny and awesome! Wield “Makarov (The People’s Gun!) or the “Budget Revolver” for affordable options. For Supreme firepower pick up the “Machine Fist” or the “Shotgun Full of Hate!” + Tons of iconic guns like “Void Marshal” (Han Solo), “Heroine” (Samus Aron), “Mine Cutter” (Dead Space), and “Deck4rd” (Blade Runner). 

Each character has a reason that they are in the Gungeon looking for the ultimate loot, the gun that can KILL THE PAST! This is awesome because it’s kinda a quirky idea, but also because everyone in real life has something that they would go back in time and change. It is a noble goal, but do you have what it takes to conquer the Gungeon?

Gameplay: Shoot and dodge with 180 + guns

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As is true with many roguelikes, EtG has loot, loot, and more loot! Most of which has to be purchased before it’s added to the pool of randomly available treasure on each individual delve. It’s a ton of fun to collect more wild and crazy weapons and items the longer you play. This awesome element of looting and shopping combined with the actual gameplay of fighting enemies is near perfect. The gameplay is basically just a matter of timing dodge-rolls under patterns of bullets while mastering each random weapon you’ve picked up on the current delve. Since this is a bullet-hell game dodging can be the hardest thing to nail down on your way to Gungeon mastery, especially when it’s boss killin’ time!

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Of course, these are just the basic mechanics and each delve will evolve its own strategies and challenges as  you pick up unique items and weapons. Arguably this is the best thing about roguelikes; each run changes and evolves as you play it.

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Difficulty: After Lvl 1 all bets are off…

EtG certainly has a learning curve. I’m not going to say it’s as hard as some other “hardcore games” that punish players brutally for every mistake, (like Darkest Dungeon) but as you descend to deeper and deeper levels the game will ramp up difficulty sharply. Cleaning floor 1 for me personally is a cake walk after 60+ hours game experience, but after walking onto floor 2 things can go incredibly well or start to take a turn for the worst. Since so many elements of each dungeon are randomly generated rooms, they can be super easy or throw 4 waves of enemies at the player as early as the first room of a delve. I would not say that the game is RNG heavy, though there are a lot of random variables. Though there is a lot to learn with gunplay, the really important skill for Gungeon survival is learning to dodge and maneuver so you don’t take damage. Because of the insane spray of bullets that often build up deep into floor 3 and on, this can become quite difficult.

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Some gamers have questioned if the game is too hard. I suppose this is a matter of opinion.  Even though I personally have never beaten the last boss nor assembled all 4 pieces of the bullet for the gun that will kill the past, I’m not dissuaded from playing the game still. I feel confident that with practice and persistence I’ll reach much further goals in my future Gungeon crawls, + have a ton of fun!

Enter the Gungeon is an incredibly fun game, playable single player or co-op with 1 friend. Both modes are incredibly entertaining and well crafted. With hundreds of guns and items to find + challenges, achievements, bosses, NPCs, secrets, and hidden items, EtG will keep players entertained well into this winter. And for those who have been playing for a while, sometime this fall EtG is getting a huge free update:“The Supply Drop Update”!!!!!

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Enter the Gungeon is available on PC through Steam and the Humble Store, as well as on PlayStation 4 for $15. You will die often, but trust me, this one is worth it!

Happy Shooting Friends!

 

Dominate the Sepia Pixel Skies!

Luftrausers is an excellent arcade game created with modern and classic game elements. when I looked at my Steam library I discovered I’ve logged 23 hours of flight time in this great retro shooter. That may seem a bit high for a simple arcade game, especially one that has no level progression, but that’s one of the great things about Luftrausers, it’s beautifully simple and like a good song that gets stuck in your head, it just works. The college semester I bought this it became my go-to homework break activities. This punchy fast-paced shooter is great to jump in and burn through 20 lives or so in search of that high score you’ve been chasing. Every play is a kick of WWII arcade nostalgia and adrenaline.

Story & Setting – The Wrong Side of History? The setting of Luftrausers is not really part of the gameplay at all. The game is a sort of playful nod to all those rumors and stories of WWII German war inventions and science experiments. You play as the German super weapon taking down the faceless hoards of the Allied powers. Though this seems to be the setting of the game, there is no story beyond that, just hours of bullet hell arcade action.

Gameplay – True Arcade Simplicity. As I mentioned before, the gameplay is very simple, even minimalist. This seems to be an intentional return to true arcade roots; the player uses two directional steering, one fire button, and one thrust button. Some more modern game elements are present though as well such as achievements that you must complete to unlock new ship components, which you can mix and match to fit your particular fighting style. Though the gameplay is simple, it’s compelling. You mostly are trying to out shoot larger enemies while tearing through swarms of small planes to keep your multiplier up to score those big points!

As I mentioned before there are many different weapon and body types to choose from. This is great because it makes gameplay custom to each player and also gives you goals to work towards as you work to unlock each one.  The different combinations make for exciting and sometimes bizarre combat situations, making gameplay different with each new combo.

Difficulty – Easy to Learn, Difficult to Master. The difficulty of this game starts relatively easy, and grows steadily harder the longer your plane stays alive. On each run until other experimental planes show up followed by massive blimps filling the skies with bullets. This will eventually be extremely hard to survive though the opportunity for a higher score accompanies this new level of danger. If you do not feel challenged enough, you can also activate SFMT mode, and really punish yourself for playing with brutal and near impossible odds.

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To sum it up, Luftrausers is a great game that deserves attention from arcade shooter fans of all kinds. It makes for a great game to compete with friends for high scores. My brother and I went back and forth for a long time competing for that top spot after the other would beat the old best score. With a current play time of 23 hours, my highest score is currently 34,875 points. If anyone has a better one let me know on the blog or through our Facebook and Twitter accounts! The game can be purchased on Steam or directly from the website  for $10.

Happy Rausing friends!

– Jacob Tillson 

 

– A NEW ODYSSEY FOR CLASSIC SHMUPS PLAYERS –

Hydora is a game that I stumbled across in the archives of my favorite game blog, Indiegames.com. Hydora was made by Locomalito, a game company that has made several other interesting and creative games of varying genre and styles. The group  produces a lot of cool merchandise in addition to bringing interesting and innovative retro-style games into today’s modern world. Although you can purchase the merch and disks of the games with covers, you can also download this specific game directly from their website, completely free.

Hydora is a side-scrolling shooter game that is sort of a mix between an 80’s style arcade game and a modern art project. The game holds more complexity and individuality than that of a true arcade game, yet still holds to simple game play and basic upgrades such as a simple primary and secondary weapon. (you pick your first and second weapon before each level), all with in game-play power-ups. I got the game because I was looking for a good game to play when I needed a break from stress, and I love old scrolling shooter games.  The thing that really got my attention about this one was the excellence in pixel art. I love the practical and aesthetic value of the level design and am surprised this game is not more well known, as it is truly excellent.

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Story/Setting – An old favorite with a new style. The setting of the game starts in a very simple and traditional space-shooter setting that feels natural and fitting. But as you continue playing the setting quickly becomes more interesting and rapidly deviates from player expectations. There are no “worlds” or chunks of levels with single themes, but rather every level spills into the next and features a very unique and strong theme, often with completely original enemies and environmental hazards. The setting is as skillful re-imagining of a familiar style and genre.

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Gameplay – If it ain’t broke…  The gamplay it’s-self could be described as simple and solid. Though much of the game is very original, the game play is actually completely traditional for a scrolling shooter; movement, guns, and a super bomb type weapon you collect in the level. One innovation to this traditional method was that you collect a new weapon (either primary, secondary, or super bomb) after every level, and select your choice a the beginning of each stage. This was clever and interesting, and though not hugely necessary, it was fun. The weapon selection and gameplay works well as a solid foundation for the rest of the game to be built on.

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Difficulty – 80’s style arcade brutality. As a part of the game’s self-described 80’s arcade roots, it can be sincerely difficult. unless you have a shield, which is very hard to obtain, a single hit from anything will kill you, (and even then, 2 hits kills you). Every death will also rob you of some gun power and movement speed you will have to struggle to earn back. This is fun, but at times can also be frustrating.

Overall, Hydora is one of my favorites. For a retro style shooter I would give it a 9/10. It’s not super long, but it’s high difficulty will keep you battling to finish this beautifully created modern space adventure. Everyone interested in indie games should give this one a try, and being that it is free to download, there is nothing stopping you from engaging in this bizarre galactic struggle. Suit up and join the fight to save the human race, you’ll be glad you did!

For more cool Hydora stuff, click here!